Skip to main content

About your Search

20120701
20120731
STATION
CSPAN3 16
LANGUAGE
English 16
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jul 7, 2012 3:30am EDT
significant impact on this country, and left us a large legacy. i can just sort of recite some of the things that he did. but even that wouldn't even touch in any way the fullness and the breadth of his impact on late 19th century america. again, most of us know he served five terms in congress. he served in the south carolina senate. he served in the south carolina house. and, of course, he was the collector of customs for the port of buford. but beyond those things, he provides us with sort of an understanding and a way of reinterpreting reconstruction, a way of reinterpreting the civil rights movement. now -- so he sort of brings together those two fields. you heard dr. powers allude to his being sort of the precursor to the second reconstruction because of what he did in the 19th century. well, let me start this way by talking about reconstruction and robert smalls' a role in it. you'll see how these two things come together in terms of how he has influenced american historiography. in 1909, w.e.b. dubois spoke before the american historical association in new york city. he did a present
CSPAN
Jul 7, 2012 12:00am EDT
an event al attack by u.s. army forces. they will be defeated. the army will evacuate but the navy will keep up a presence throughout the war. in the meantime, besides the military, actions that are going on, there is going to be this sort of start of reconstruction. i'm not going to go into a great deal of this. but part of this will be taking smalls to the north. to help raise public knowledge. slaves could be part of this military force. smalls is the perfect example of this. dupont was weary of this. he said if you are going to do this, you might as well turn robert over to bartam and let him put him on display. the frepnch wanted a moral impression. at the same time dupont could not spare him. he also thanks to dupont, smalls and the male members of the vessel coming out will receive prize money. prize money is something that would be taken to a prize court. then the value of the ship, smalls and the other dupont bro the secretary of the navy suggested that the others make the prize money available to them. he eventually purchased the home of his former master. another key pla
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2012 5:00pm EDT
. we begin with chief of interpretation at ft. mchenry in baltimore. he recently joined us to talk about the fort bombardment and the creation of the star spangled banner. this is about 30 minutes. you are looking at the arrival of tall ships at baltimore's fort mchenry. welcome to american history tv on cspan3 where we'll be live until 2:00 p.m. eastern today, taking your calls and talking with historians about this little-known war. we'll go live to ft. mchenry now, the home of the star spangled banner. we are joined by vince vaise. chief of interpretation at ft. mchenry thanks for joining us this morning. >> good morning. >> before we get into our conversation with you we want to invite our viewers by phone. it's easy to do that in the you're in the eastern or central time zone. that number is 202-737-0002. make sure you mute your television when you call in and we will get to your calls in a moment. when visitors come to mt. mchenry, what is the reason you tell them the war of 1812 is significant in american history? >> this is really the war that defined us as a people and rea
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2012 9:00am EDT
of the little never war of 1812. we begin with vincent vaise. he recently joined us to talk about "the star spangled banner." this is about 30 minutes. you are looking at the arrival of tall ships at baltimore's fort mchenry. welcome to american history tv on cspan3 where we'll be live today. we are joined by vince vaise. before we get into our conversation with you we want to invite our viewers by phone. the number -- make sure you mute your calls when you call in. >> this made the flag the symbol of the american people that it is today. yes, the american flag had already been invented, but it was really during the war of 1812 in which the american flag won international respect through the words of francis scott key and the successful defense of this fort during the war of 1812 from the british and also some of the great naval battles of the war of 1812, like the american ships, like "old ironsides," the "constitution." >> you are dressed in full battle or full formal regalia at ft. mchenry. why don't you tell us a bit about the uniform you're wearing and where exactly in the fort you're
CSPAN
Jul 6, 2012 10:00pm EDT
talks about how slaves used the u.s. mail to communicate with other slaves and how they planned and executed escapes to canada, mexico and the caribbean. held at penn state university this is an hour and 15 minutes. >> thank you, tony. that was almost ministerial. i feel as if i'm really in church now. okay. it's an honor to be here. thanks for making this possible. it's wonderful to be in penn state in march and see people in shorts. there is something to be said for global warming. let me suggest a couple of things as we start -- before we start rattling on tonight. one is i'm going to set this discussion these series of lectures beginning with the fugitive slave law of 1850. to me the pivotal political event in the decade leading up to the civil war. the fugitive slave law changes the political dynamics of this country in ways that nobody could have anticipated at the time. and at the center of that change in political dynamic are the activities of slaves themselves who run away. so what i am interested in looking at in the series of lectures then is how does the action of th
CSPAN
Jul 6, 2012 10:30pm EDT
knew the answer but that did little too ease his concern. slaves who had left the south used the postal system to communicate with loved ones and friends left behind. the reverend robert ryeland, the white minister of the first african church of virginia railed be ernst receiving letters -- his congregation receiving letters from former members of his church who had escaped in which they described the best ways to reach freedom. the use of the mail rivalled slave holders who prohibited its use to disseminate abolitionist materials. starting in 1851, mail sent between new york and california, for example was charged a flat rate of 3 cents per half ounce. this meant that anyone, and that included fugitive slaves like banks could correspond with family and friends cheaply. slaves contemplating escape sometimes made plans with friends and family already in the north and in canada before leaving. a man with the unfortunate name of john bull and joe mayor, two of the five run aways found on a steam ship in the james river in 1858 knew where they were going. bull had arranged with friends in c
CSPAN
Jul 6, 2012 11:00pm EDT
of their color out of an american vessel, be they free or otherwise. it is possible that the u.s. government could have followed harrison's suggestion and taken the dispute before the mixed commission jointly set about between the u.s. and britain to deal with such cases but in the end, they chose not to do so. the anderson case is erie similar to another case involving a fugitive slave also known as john anderson who fled to canada at the end of the decade to avoid prostitution for murder. arrested and brought before the court of queen's bench, anderson was finally freed on a technicality following intense public pressure on the british government organized in london by the foreign anti-slaveried society. both cases also raised questions about the political reach of american fugitive slave laws and the many ways opponents found to resist the enforcement at home and abroad. as in so many other instances, it was anderson, handy and lois who took the decision to act, to get on board the ships in baltimore and charleston and doing so they opened up a heated debate with international repercussio
CSPAN
Jul 1, 2012 1:30pm EDT
. and so, the strategic use of deviations in a plan, overpopulate and under populate or specifically advantage some parts of the state at the expense of others would be a problem, even for non-congressional districts. now, the problem is, as i said in large versus cox is that this was a partisan gerrymander that selectively used this to punish political adversaries. but that doesn't mean partisan gerrymanders or partisanship in general is unconstitutional and as a factor in the redistricting process. instead, the supreme court has actually resigned itself to the fact that partisanship will often be an extremely important factor in the redistricting process. and in gaffney versus cummings, it upheld a bipartisan gerrymander. so the intent of the connecticut redistricting plan in that case was to create districts that were safe for democrats and republicans. and so, the idea was, it was -- say 50% democratic state, 50% republican state, that if you -- they drew districts that would be 50% -- half the districts might be democrat. half the districts would be republican, and as a result,
CSPAN
Jul 6, 2012 8:00pm EDT
. that action freed himself, his family and 12 other slaves. he went onto become a republican member of the u.s. house. this is two hours. >> good afternoon. my name is joe divey and it is my pleasure to welcome you to this wonderful celebration of an american hero. i get to do something tonight that pastors seldom get to do. i get to do the first part and then i get to sit down and shut up. our modtraitor is the great great grandson of robert smalls. he is think experienced executive with the strong and dynamic career driving growth and innovation an consumer marketing companies. and marketing management with the general management and leadership skill to offer a blend of management capabilities he has earned a degree from the maxwell school and from the school of business at duke university and it is my pleasure to present to you mr. michael moore. [ applause ] >> good evening. it has been a wonderful day here in charleston. we started this morning at the charleston museum and there were a couple of very meaningful unveilings on the harbor. and we are capping the evening off with really rich
CSPAN
Jul 6, 2012 7:00pm EDT
actually able to use their position of being creditors to buy up the suez canal. that's the reason that they took control of it, and the egyptian ruler, a man named ismael, just didn't have the money to finance the statue of liberty. this was in the late 1860s now. and bartholdi went back to france, disappointed that he wasn't going to be able to build his statue in the land of the great ancient colossal statues, and a whole variety of circumstances intervened. one was the franco-prussian war which kicked bartholdi out of his home. he was from the province of alcace which was occupied from the germans and bartholdi's home city was komar and his own home was occupied by german soldiers. he was a great french patriot and refused to go there as long as the germans were occupying it, so he went back to paris only to have the paris commune break out. the pairs commune was a revolution in which the working people of the city basically seized control of the government and wanted to institute a very radical form of politics. bartholdi was again a liberal in the 19th century sense which wou
CSPAN
Jul 6, 2012 11:30pm EDT
of the work that he did actually laid the ground work for the second reconstruction. another term used to describe the american civil rights movement. secondly, smalls' life is a consummately american story. a story of triumph over adversity, success against the odds, and of course what better place to talk about such an american life than in charleston, smalls' second home and indeed a city unique in its contributions to americana and those things that would become afro americana. i want to talk about smalls' later life. i want to talk about his experiences in beaufort, but mainly in charleston as a way of understanding how these environments prepared him for his later achievements in life. now robert smalls is born in 1839 in beaufort, he's the son of lydia polite, who was the son of -- mckee was a planter and he owned approximately 60 different people who he used mainly in the country side. but lydia and robert comprised the main part of his domestic labor force at his beaufort home. know domestic service had its positive aspects and it's disadvantages for example. domestics were on
CSPAN
Jul 7, 2012 3:00am EDT
localized and you see more slaves and free blacks being used on the steam ships operating along the coast. it was said that the term pilot was only reserved for whites. the planter will operate along the coast after the firing on fort sumter. she will be found between jacksonville, florida, up to charleston and going up to geor georgetown. linton off the southern coast to stop the importantation off the coast and the exportations used to buy military goods to europe. trying to stop any training now. the problem was, to have an effective blockade you have to have staemeamed war ships, you e to have places you need coaling stations. forward to have a stronger blockade. you have to have seizing harbors along the coast line. and on november # 7th, 1861, with 17 vessels, the largest fleet ever organized by the united states up to this time will seize port royal sound. they will drive away the confederate army and the vast majority of the land owners and the planters within the sea islands. they will come ashore and control 8,000 slaves. though not initially prepared to deal with the slaves, th
CSPAN
Jul 8, 2012 6:30pm EDT
strategically, as well. >> the west point significance is that because it is the only way, using organized armies for both sides, it's the only way they can imagine how to fight a war. so because they think it's unethical to some degree to use a guerrilla strategy for both sides. for both sides, it's -- no matter which section you go with, you go to west point, yes, you have a sectional loyalty but you end up in a military institution that says this is the way soldiers appropriately fight. and that's a different issue than what your political allegiance is going to be. so that to some degree imprisons them. that's part of the reason, but part of the reason is that guerrilla warfare is a lot more problematic and has all sorts of problems and complications that probably would not have made it a viable solution anyways even if these guys did do that, even though some confederates talked about it. that doesn't mean it would have worked. >> sir, i believe there's actually quite a definitive book on that exact subject right there called "west pointers in the civil war" which discusses that same
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2012 2:30pm EDT
the employment of free will less useful and more rare, it confines the action of the will in the smart space and little by little steals the very use of it from the citizen. equality has prepared men for all these things and has exposed them and to regard them as a benefit and i think here tocqueville is providing 80 or 100 years, 80 years before the progressive movement and 100 years before the new deal. it is not simply that they are economically harmful, that they tend to deter the economic activity, prosperity and economic growth. it is their effect on the character of people, the effect that the superintendent government that tends to try to protect you from all damage and provide them perfect security. one that's run by a centralized, bureaucratic apparatus and run by alleged experts, justified by the supposed inability of ordinary people to take care of themselves and navigate the shores and reefs of the advanced, industrial democracy. this soft despotism tends to destroy human character. this despotism that assumes that people are incompetent children in treating them like that tends
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)